How can we help?

Welcome to our Knowledge Base. Search for answers using the search box below.

Disinfectant solutions and ultrasonic devices

You are here:
disinfectant solutions and ultrasonic devices

Question:

How important is it to use the correct ratios when mixing disinfectant solutions? Will too much or too little water not properly clean implements? Also, do ultrasonic devices help any with a better clean-up of implements? 

Answer:

It is important to exactly mix the proper amount of disinfectant solution with water or the solution will not be as effective. This means it must be properly measured, not estimated, and not measured by “eye”. Either too much or too little water can lower the effectiveness of a disinfectant. The amount of water to be added to a salon disinfectant is determined by extensive testing. Different amounts of water are tested to determine the exact amount of water needed to achieve maximum effectiveness. No, more is NOT better! Making a stronger disinfectant solution doesn’t make it more powerful. In fact, this can lower the effectiveness of that solution. 

Common isopropyl alcohol is a classic example. Using 70% alcohol is far more effective than 99% alcohol.  Also, making a disinfection solution too strong or too weak can make the solution more likely to dull or rust implements. Pitting and corrosion can make pedicure basins and other implements more difficult to clean. It will also allow pathogens a place to hide from disinfectant solutions and thereby lowering their effectiveness.

Ultrasonic cleaners use high-frequency sound waves to enhance the effectiveness of cleaning solutions.  Ultrasonic devices can help ensure that implements are clean before they are disinfected or sterilized. However, these devices should not be used to replace cleaning with a scrub brush, liquid soap, and running water.  After proper cleaning, an ultrasonic cleaner, for example, may dislodge debris that could be hidden in a pivot point of a nipper where a brush could not reach. So they do have some usefulness. They are not needed to make disinfectants work, though. Additionally, I have not seen any evidence that they make disinfectants work any better.

Was this article helpful?
0 out of 5 stars
5 Stars 0%
4 Stars 0%
3 Stars 0%
2 Stars 0%
1 Stars 0%
How can we improve this article?
Previous Can I work on diabetic clients?
Next Do I need qualifications to do nails?
Table of Contents